The Hueys in It Wasn't Me

Age Range: 5 - 11

A fight has broken out amongst The Hueys. "It was not me! It was him!" But no one can remember what they're fighting about. If only they could find an interesting distraction-


Book Author: Oliver Jeffers

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Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

  • The illustrations include lots of speech bubbles (which have text and illustrations in them). Can you rewrite the story using direct or reported speech to show what they are saying to each other?
  • Retell the story from the point of view of Gillespie (or one of the other Hueys).
  • Create a character profile of one of the Hueys.
  • Make a list of the punctuation used in the story. Can you explain why different types of punctuation have been used in different places?
  • Why have capital letters been used in some of the speech bubbles? What do they tell us about each character?
  • There are a number of other books about the Hueys. Could you write a new story about them?

Maths

  • Make a timetable that shows what the Hueys do when they are getting along together all day.

Computing

  • Use animation software to make a short cartoon about the Hueys.

Art

  • Can you draw your own illustration of one of the Hueys.
  • Some of the illustrations use colour and others are drawn in black and white. Can you create a picture of the same thing in those two different ways?

PSHE

  • When an argument arises, what can we do to help alleviate the situation? Make a list of ideas.
  • How does Gillespie help to resolve the argument? 
  • Look at the body language of the Hueys in the illustrations. How would you describe it? What does this tell us about each character?
  • Make a list of different emotions. Can you think of a time when you have felt each of them?

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