I Love You, Little Monster

Age Range: 5 - 11

A heart-warming rhyming story of parental love and a child's boundless energy and enthusiasm for life.


Book Author: Giles Andreae

See More Books from this author

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

  • Can you think of synonyms for the words 'Big' and 'Small'?(see Resources below)
    Rewrite the story from Small's point of view, explaining how he feels about Big.
  • Choose a sentence in the book and change one of the words. Does this change the meaning?
  • Write a diary entry from Big's point of view about the day that he has. What does he most look forward to about coming home at night?
  • Write a similar story, from your own point of view, explaining how much you love somebody close to you.
  • Look at the facial expressions in the story. Think of different words to describe how Big and Small are feeling in each picture.
  • Big says that Small lives 'as though life's one huge present, unwrapping a big every day'. What does this mean?

Design Technology

  • The illustrations show some toys in Small's bedroom. Could you design a new toy for a small monster?
  • Design a new toy boat for Big and Small to play with.

Art

  • Design your own Big and Small Monsters (see Resources below).
  • Can you draw a picture to show what 'Love' looks like? Can you draw other emotions?
  • Big tells Small to 'believe in your dreams'. Can you draw a picture of what your dreams are?

PSHE

  • The story is full of different ways that describe how much Big loves Small. Can you find them?
  • Love is one of the emotions that we feel. How does it make us feel? Think of other emotions and describe how they make you feel.
  • Think of different ways that people show each other how they feel.
  • Write about some of the things that you enjoy doing with the people that you care about.
  • Sometimes Big has to scold Small. Why do parents have to do this sometimes? How does it make us feel? Is it unfair?

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