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Teaching Ideas for a Roman themed Day!

Age Range: 5 - 11
By: Sam Collins

Teaching Ideas for a Roman themed Day!

Try out some of our teaching ideas for a themed day about Ancient Rome, or during your history and topic work.

If you have any other ideas of your own, let us know by adding a comment!

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

  • Read this online version of 'You wouldn’t want to be a Roman Gladiator' and write your own.
  • Write a news report about an important event, such as the eruption of Vesuvius, or the Roman invasion of Britain.
  • Try some of these activites to accompany Jeremy Strong’s book Romans on the Rampage.
  • Look at this list of latin words. Can you find any that are still in use today? For example, the latin word for water is “aqua”, we still use it in words such as “aquatic”.

Maths

Science

Computing

  • Use stop animation to retell a story about the Roman Gods.
  • Write a blog about an aspect of Roman life and share in online.

Design Technology

Art

  • Make some roman mosaics using squares of paper.
  • Make and decorate a clay pot.
  • Glue cut out leaves onto a headband to make a laurel wreath.

Music

Geography

History

  • Use our fact cards to write a Roman quiz and test your friends!
  • Research the Roman innovations that are still influential today, for example sewers and libraries. Legacy of the Romans - e.g. sewers, libraries etc.
  • Discuss the images in our image pack. What do they tell you about Roman life?
  • Create a Roman timeline.
  • Use these resources from the British Museum to investigate Imperial Rome.
  • Research the way of life for a figure from Roman times, and then use hot seating to share what you have learnt. Dress up as that figure and answer questions from the rest of the class!

Physical education

  • Practice marching in formation.
  • Try out some Roman sports, such as running, javelin and weightlifting.

Religious education

Languages

  • Learn how to speak like an Ancient Roman with this great video.

Teaching Ideas for a Greek themed Day!

Age Range: 5 - 11
By: Sam Collins

Teaching Ideas for a Greek themed Day!

Try out some of our teaching ideas for a themed day about Ancient Greece, or during your history and topic work.​

If you have any other ideas of your own, let us know by adding a comment!

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

Science

  • Investigate Archimedes’ principle by putting different objects into a jug of water with a scale on. Why do they displace different amounts of water?​

Computing

  • Could you use art software to create a ‘Greek key’ pattern?
  • Control a programmable robot to follow a path similar to a Greek key design.

Design Technology

Art

Geography

  • Mark the Ancient Greek city states on a map.

History

Physical education

  • Plan and take part in a Mini Olympics.​

PSHE

  • Democracy is a concept that comes from the Ancient Greeks. There is some information about it on this website. What do you know about how democracy works? Hold a democratic vote.

Teaching Ideas for a Spain themed Day!

Age Range: 5 - 11
By: Sam Collins

Teaching Ideas for a Spain themed Day!

Try out some of our teaching ideas for a Spain themed day.​

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

  • Make a tourist guide to a city or area in Spain. What should people visit and why?
  • Read or watch a Spanish version of a well known book e.g. The Very Hungry Caterpillar:

Maths

Computing

Design Technology

Art

  • Try this quick lesson on the work of Joan Miro
  • Research the life and work of a Spanish artist. For example, this page has lots of information about Diego Velazquez
  • Make some mosaics inspired by the work of Antoni Gaudi.
  • Use the template below to create your own version of the Spanish flag.

Music

  • Listen to some flamenco music and have a go at clapping the rhythms.
  • Use simple songs to learn Spanish vocabulary; such as this greetings song for younger children.

Geography

  • Mark Spain and Spanish territories on a map.
  • Use our outline map below to mark on some cities, towns and other landmarks in Spain.
  • Look at the Spanish flag. What do you know about it? Can you find out what it is called? Who designed it? How does it compare with flags of other countries?
  • Plan a trip to take in X number of famous sites.
  • Have you (or another person in your class) ever visited Spain? What do you / they remember about it? How is it similar / different to where you live?
  • Make a fact file about Spain. The information on this site may be helpful.

History

  • Find out how, and when, the Spanish language spread around the world, for example why is it so widely spoken in the Americas? Our resource will get you started.
  • Find out about famous Spanish inventors and explorers.

Physical education

Languages

World War 1 Teaching Ideas

Age Range: 7 - 11
By: Sam Collins

World War 1 Teaching Ideas

Whether you're planning a World War 1 themed day, week or term, try some of our teaching ideas, resources and classroom activities!

Don't forget to download our popular resource pack too.

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

  • Read the book War Horse by Michael Morpurgo and try some of our related teaching ideas.
  • Use hot seating to explore the feelings and experiences of some of the people who took part in WW1. This works well if an adult initially models how to play the part and answer questions.  
  • Write a letter home from the trenches. Remember that your letter might be censored if it contains sensitive information! 
  • Read this information about British recruiting posters of the time and design your own, using persuasive techniques to make people want to join up. 
  • Write a diary entry for a soldier in the trenches, or a nurse working on the frontline. This web page contains lots of information about nurses working in different parts of the world during WW1. 
  • Write a newspaper report about the Battle of the Somme or the sinking of the Lusitania. 
  • Write a biography of someone taking part in the war.
  • Watch this news report about Peter Jackson's colourful World War 1 documentary. Think of some questions that you would like to ask him (or one of the soldiers shown in the video):

Maths

Science

  • Many scientific advances occurred during WW1 as a direct consequence of the war. For example, synthetic rubber was developed in Germany as the allies cut off the supply of natural rubber to the country. Marie Curie developed portable x-ray machines that could be used at the front. Research and make a fact file about one of the scientific advances.

Computing

Design Technology

  • Try this recipe for Trench Stew. Would you like to eat it?
  • Make some ANZAC biscuits, which were sent to Australian and New Zealand soldiers fighting at Gallipoli. They were designed to have a long shelf life, as they had to travel to the soldiers by sea. 

Art

  • Look at some examples of trench art, such as this jug made from a shell case. Why do you think that soldiers made things like this? Design your own piece of trench art. 
  • Poppies are an important symbol of remembrance. Have a go at making your own using a variety of media, for example collage or pastels.
  • Try making some pinwheel poppies using this template.

Music

  • Use this performance pack from the BBC to explore the music of the War and even put on your own performance.
  • Learn some WW1 songs, such as Pack up your Troubles.

Geography

  • Mark the main battles of WW1 on a map of the world.

History

Physical education

  • Try marching to military band music. Can you keep in formation?

Religious education

  • In 1914, British and German soldiers decided to have a Christmas truce. Find out about this event. Why did it happen? Why do you think it was only for Christmas?
  • Use British Legion Assembly Resources to deliver an interesting assembly. 

PSHE

  • Why do we have Remembrance Day? Do you think it is important? If possible, visit a local war memorial.

Teaching Ideas for a Geography Day!

Age Range: 7 - 11
By: Sam Collins

Teaching Ideas for a Geography Day!

Focus on Geography by having an Geography Day in your classroom! Our post has plenty of cross-curricular ideas to try with your children.

These ideas could also be used as part of Geography lessons in a week, month or term.

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

  • Read a book set in a contrasting part of the world to your own, for example Kensuke’s Kingdom by Michael Morpurgo or the Katie Morag stories by Mairi Hedderwick. Discuss similarities and differences.
  • Design a persuasive leaflet promoting your town to visitors. What can people do, where should they visit?
  • Give groups of children locations around the world. Can they write a postcard including information that will identify where they are?

Maths

  • Read scales on different instruments, for example rain gauges, thermometers and anemometers.
  • Try out some transport timetable word problems.
  • Make graphs showing the temperature, wind speed or rainfall of the current week. Compare it to the same week in the previous year.

Science

Computing

  • Create a geography quiz in Powerpoint.
  • Visit all seven continents on Google Earth.
  • Set up a treasure hunt around your school and grounds using QR codes with this useful program from Class Tools.
  • Set up some maps for your roamers or beebots to navigate.

Design Technology

Art

  • Look at the work of Andy Goldsworthy and create some outdoor art yourself from natural objects.
  • Make a papier mache map of a country, or even the whole world.

Music

  • Listen to music from different countries and have a go at making up your own in the same style.
  • Take the instruments outside and compose or play some music in the fresh air.

Geography

  • Set up an orienteering trail in the school grounds
  • Look at your local area on Google Maps or Google Earth. Draw a map showing your route from home to school.
  • Become a travel agent and plan a trip. Include modes of transport, accommodation and an itinerary of things to do.
  • Look at some features of your local area, are they natural or manmade? How can you tell?
  • Set up a weather station in the school grounds.
  • Give each class a country to research and come together at the end of the day to share what you have learnt.
  • Find your birthday coordinates with one of these fun ideas from National Geographic.
  • Get outside and build some dens.
  • Use our Inspiration posters to start discussions about geographical concepts.

History

  • Use some old photos of your locality to investigate how the human geography has changed over time. For example, how has the high street changed?

Physical education

  • Learn some dances from other countries.

Religious education

  • Research religions around the world. Find out where they started and mark those places on a world map.
  • Look at this World Religions map. Why do you think that specific religions are concentrated in different parts of the world?

Languages

  • Learn how to say a few key phrases in the language of a country you have been studying.
  • Learn the names of cities in their native language and other languages. For example; London (English) Londres (French) Londen (Dutch).

PSHE

  • Discuss the impact of humans on the planet. How would it be different if humans didn’t exist?

Teaching Ideas for a Science Day!

Age Range: 7 - 11
By: Sam Collins

Teaching Ideas for a Science Day!

Bring science to life by holding a Science Day in your classroom! Our post has plenty of cross-curricular ideas to try with your children.

These ideas could also be used as part of Science lessons in a week, month or term.
 

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

  • Set up a science quiz. In teams, children research and write science questions. Put them together to make a quiz. Can another class answer them? What about a children vs staff competition?
  • Write an explanation of how an experiment you are doing works.
  • Write some instructions for another class to perform an experiment.
  • Research and write a biography of a famous scientist.
  • Run a debate on a science topic, for example “More money should be spent on space travel” or “Plastic bags should be banned”.
  • Research and write an article about a scientific issue, for example pollution.
  • Write an advertisement for a scientific object. What would persuade someone to buy a microscope, for example?

Maths

  • Set up some timing challenges, how long does it take you to jump 10 times, or run from one side of the playground to the other? Remember to time accurately and record your findings. Compare different people’s results in a table.
  • Collect as many different measuring instruments as you can. What are they used for? How do you use and read them accurately? What experiments could you use them for?
  • When you are doing an experiment, swap your results with another group and write a conclusion based on them. Did you interpret the results the same way?
  • Explore units of measure and match them to their correct use. What is measured in newtons? What is measured in amps?

Science

  • Organise a science fair. A few weeks before the event, ask children to work on a science project that they can demonstrate on the day (this could be an independent task for home learning, or a group task in class). On Science Day, set up the projects and invite parents, carers and other classes to visit, while the children present their work. There are hundreds of ideas here, searchable by age.
  • Make your own lava lamp.
  • Go on a minibeast hunt in the school grounds or a local park.
  • Plant some seeds or bulbs and monitor their growth over the following days and weeks.
  • Make a paperclip helicopter.
  • Make your own slime (this is a UK version).
  • Try out one of the classroom friendly experiments on the Marvin and Milo site.
  • Make a balloon powered car.
  • Investigate bubbles. Make sure you use a good bubble mixture, like this one from Red Ted Art. Try making different shape and size bubble wands, from old coat hangers for example. What happens when you change the shape? Which shape is the most effective?
  • Make a bottle bird feeder for your outside area.
  • Try making some fun games using circuits (requires flash player).
  • Fill some balloons with water and freeze them overnight. How long will they take to melt in different conditions? For younger children, freeze small objects into the balloons.
  • Watch this video for inspiration, then create your own domino run.

Computing

Design Technology

  • Try this Build a Bridge challenge.
  • Demonstrate reversible and irreversible changes by melting some chocolate and cooking an omelette. You can turn the melted chocolate back into solid chocolate, but can you change the omelette back into eggs?

Art

Music

Geography

History

  • Research the life of a famous scientist and make a short video about their life.
  • Create a timeline of scientific discoveries.

Physical education

  • Investigate the effect of exercise on the human body. Take your pulse and breathing rate before you begin, then run on the spot for one minute. What has happened to your pulse and breathing rate? How long does it take to get back to your resting rate?
  • Investigate trajectory by setting up a simple target (for example a bucket) and throwing a range of items into it, for example, balls of different sizes, balloons, scarves, bean bags etc. Make sure it is a fair test by always standing in the same place to throw. How do the different items behave? Why?
  • Create a dance based on the water cycle.

PSHE

  • Discuss some ethical questions raised by science, for example, should we save endangered animals?

Teaching Ideas for a Royal Wedding

Age Range: 5 - 11

Teaching Ideas for a Royal Wedding

Celebrate the royal wedding with some of these teaching ideas and classroom activities!

If you have any other ideas, please add a comment to share them with others.

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

Computing

  • Use publishing software to design an invitation to the royal wedding.
  • Use a spreadsheet to plan a royal wedding party. What food / drinks / entertainment would you need? How many people will attend? How much will each item cost? How much will the party cost altogether?
  • Record a video news report about the wedding preparations.
  • Research some facts about the bride and groom and use PowerPoint to make a quiz about them.

Design Technology

  • Design a royal wedding ring.
  • Design and make some flags to fly during a royal wedding celebration.
  • Bake a special royal wedding cake.
  • Design a gift box for a wedding present.
  • Use decorative hole punches to make some confetti.
  • The royal wedding has been recreated using Lego. Can you create your own model to represent the event?

Art

Music

  • Compose a tune that could be played while the bride walks up the aisle.
  • Create a playlist of songs for a royal party.

Geography

  • Where is the royal wedding taking place? Can you plan a journey from your home or school?
  • Plan the route of a royal wedding procession in your local area.

History

  • Create a family tree for the royal couple.
  • Design a coat of arms for the royal couple.
  • Research a royal wedding from history. 
  • Create a fact file about the wedding venue, Windsor Castle.

Religious education

  • Find out how weddings are celebrated in different religions. What are the similarities and differences?
  • Have you attended any weddings? What parts of them do you remember?
  • Invite a vicar to school to talk about Christian wedding ceremonies.

Languages

  • Learn some wedding vocabulary in the language you are studying.

PSHE

  • If you could plan the royal wedding, who would you invite as guests? Use our template to make a list of people that you think deserve to attend. Can you give reasons for your choices.
  • How do you think the bride and groom will be feeling as they prepare for the wedding day? When have you felt like that?

Teaching Ideas for an Egyptian Day!

Age Range: 7 - 11
By: Sam Collins

  • Learn about Ancient Egypt by having an Egyptian Day in your classroom! Our post has plenty of cross-curricular ideas to try with your children.
  • These ideas could also be used as part of History lessons in a week, month or term.
  • Remember to download our popular Egyptians resource pack too!

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

Maths

  • Try some of the great egyptian maths ideas here.
  • Explore the Ancient Egyptian Number system on this site and try writing a few numbers of your own.
  • Explore number pyramids in this activity.

Science

Computing

Design Technology

Art

  • Make some Egyptian masks.
  • Paint some egyptian designs on home made papyrus (see Design and Technology ideas, above).
  • Design your own egyptian god.  

Music

  • Listen to some Ancient Egyptian music and have a go at composing some of your own.

Geography

  • Mark the important landmarks on a map of Egypt.
  • Plan a trip to visit the sights of Ancient Egypt. How could you get there? What would you need to pack?
  • The River Nile was crucially important in Ancient Egypt, as it still is today. Make a poster with key facts about the Nile.

History

Physical education

  • Create your own dance to Egyptian music.

Religious education

  • The Ancient Egypts believed in many gods. Find out about a few of them. How to they compare to other religions that have many gods?
  • Some parts of the bible are set in Egypt. Read the story of Moses leading the Israelites out of Egypt.

PSHE

  • Research the building of the Aswan Dam. 90,000 people relocated to make room for it, and Ancient Egyptian monuments had to be moved. Do you think this was the right thing to do?

Teaching Ideas for a Tudor Day!

Age Range: 7 - 11
By: Sam Collins

Set up a Tudor-themed day in your classroom with this enormous collection of cross-curricular teaching ideas and activities!

These ideas could also be used over a week, month or term when your children are learning about the Tudors.

Don’t forget to download our enormous Tudor resource pack too!

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

  • Watch this video about Shakespeare and then have a go at writing your own Shakespearean plays. Discuss how Shakespeare used known stories for his plays.

 

  • Write a persuasive advert for a Tudor house using this template.
  • Hold a class debate on a Tudor topic. For example, was Henry right to divorce Catherine of Aragon? Who should become Monarch when Elizabeth I dies?  
  • Storyboard the story of the Spanish Armada.
  • Write a letter from Henry VIII to Catherine of Aragon, explaining why he wants a divorce.
  • Write your own “horrible history” style fact files about a Tudor figure.
  • Collect, illustrate and display key Tudor vocabulary.
  • Look at this list of words invented by Shakespeare. Look up their meanings in a dictionary.
  • Listen to some stories from Shakespeare.
  • Write a newspaper article about the Battle of Bosworth Field.
  • Write a few lines of iambic pentameter, with the help of this page.

Maths

  • Invent some Tudor themed word problems. For example; You are planning a feast for Henry VIII. He has invited 420 people. For the meat course, one leg of mutton is enough for 3 people. How many legs of mutton will you need?
  • Write the dates of the reigns of the Tudor monarchs in roman numerals.
  • Explore tudor money and set some questions, for example; how many pennies in half a crown?

Science

Computing

  • Use PowerPoint to design a quiz about the Tudors.
  • Watch this video and use to stimulate discussion on spam emails and messages.

Design Technology

Art

  • Watch this Horrible Histories video and then paint your own portrait of Queen Elizabeth I.

Music

Geography

  • Look at some of the maps on this page and compare them to modern day maps. Why are they so different?
  • Sir Francis Drake was the first Englishman to sail around the world. Plot his journey  on a map of the world.
  • Draw a plan for a Tudor knot garden, like this one.

History

  • Create a tudor family tree
  • Use these ideas and photos to research Tudor homes.
  • Compare the lives of rich and poor people in tudor times. You can find information here and here.
  • Research Tudor medicines. This page is a good starting point.
  • Create a Tudor timeline. What events could you include?
  • Look at some tudor artefacts and find out more about them, for example on this site.

Physical education

Religious education

  • Find out about the differences and similarities between the present day Church of England and the Catholic Church.

PSHE

  • Tudor punishments were very severe, for example school children were often whipped if they misbehaved. What kind of punishments do you think are appropriate in school? Why might we need them?

Typing Resources for Schools

Age Range: 5 - 11
By: Sam Collins

Typing Resources for Schools

With more and more work in class being done on electronic devices, typing is becoming a key skill. Left to their own devices, children can develop an idiosyncratic style which slows them down. Just like teaching an efficient handwriting method, teaching basic keyboard skills allows children to concentrate on content as typing becomes automatic. There are plenty of free resources on the web and we have rounded up some of the best!

These sites fall into two types; those that teach keyboard skills and those that provide games for the children to practice. A useful approach is to use the teaching sites initially, then use the games sites for the children to consolidate and build speed.

Please note that some of these sites are flash based, so will not run on mobile devices.

Keyboard Skills sites

These sites all use a structured approach to teach skills in a logical sequence.

  • Dance Mat Typing - This site is exactly the kind of quality you would expect to find on the BBC site. Perfect for Year 2 (6 years old) upwards, although upper KS2 (9-11 years old) might find it a little young for them, it walks the children through each stage with clear instructions. A great site to get them started before moving onto something a little more complex. There is no option to save progress. Best used with headphones. This site uses Adobe Flash.

Dance Mat Typing

  • Typing.com - This site is great for complete beginners, with the keys broken down into small steps, allowing a good grounding and rapid movement through the exercises. The interface is clean and attractive and the graphics make it very clear where the fingers need to be placed. Suitable for use from Year 3 (7 years old) upwards. This site does not use Adobe Flash. 
  • Typing Class - There are no options to save progress here, but this simple site does have lots of lessons and the colour coded keyboard helps children to identify which finger goes where. Suitable for use with KS2 (7-11 years old). This site does not use Adobe Flash. 
  • Typing Club - A very attractively designed site that starts with very simple exercises. It is perfect for complete beginners, as it gives plenty of exercises for consolidation and introduces new keys slowly. Suitable for use with KS2 (7-11 years old). This site does not use Adobe Flash. 
  • Typing School - This very comprehensive site allows you to set up classes, track progress and set lessons, as well as giving feedback on accuracy. The interface is however clearly more aimed at adults than children and even the simple exercises are quite complex. A good choice for confident upper Key Stage 2 (9-11 years old) typists who are ready for something a little more formal. This site does not use Adobe Flash.

Schools with a subscription to Purple Mash can also access 2Type. This gives information about posture, a range of typing activities and games, instructional videos and a printable keyboard.
 

Typing Games sites

These sites are perfect for practising skills once children have become familiar with the correct finger placement. Unsurprisingly, they tend to feature sound effects so headphones are strongly recommended! 

  • Keyboard climber - A fun game for KS1 (5-7 years old) children to practice using individual keys. This site uses Adobe Flash.

Keyboard Climber

  • Free Typing games - Fun games for use with KS2 (7-11) including ghost, space and racing themed games to practice typing individual letters and words. This site does not use Adobe Flash.
  • Nitro Type - This site allows your pupils to race as a guest or enter the typing competition. Good practice and very motivating for children who have good keyboard skills.Suitable for use in Key Stage 2 (9-11 years old).This site does not use Adobe Flash.  
  • Typing games - A huge site with over 50 typing games, suitable right across the primary age range. The site is also searchable, meaning you can find exactly what you need your pupils to practice! This site does not use Adobe Flash.

Have we missed any great typing tools? Let us know your favourites in the comments below.

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