Introducing Decimals

Age Range: 7 - 11

In order to introduce decimals to children using the following method, they need to have had some previous experience of fractions (in particular tenths).

1) Draw a rectangle on the board and split it into ten sections. Ask a child how we can label each section of the rectangle (i.e. 1/10). Write 1/10 in each section...

1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10

2) Colour some of the rectangles, e.g.

1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10


3) Ask the children what fraction of the rectangle has been coloured (i.e. 1/10 + 1/10 + 1/10 = 3/10).

4) Explain that 3/10 can be written in another way... i.e. 0.3 (no units and three tenths)

5) Explain the features of the notation:

  • The dot in between the 0 and the 3 is called the DECIMAL POINT and we use it to separate the units from the tenths.

  • We always write in the 0 before the decimal point because it reminds us that the whole number is less than one.

  • We say this number as "nought point three" or "zero point three".

6) Now give each child a copy of the strips worksheet below. They should cut out a strip and colour some of the sections (and then stick it in their books). Next, they should write the following information into their books, changing the numbers according to the number of strips that they have coloured.

1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10


7/10 of the strip has been coloured.
7/10 can also be written as 0.7, which we say as "nought point seven" or "zero point seven".

7) Step 6 can be repeated with the children colouring different number so sections on new strips.

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Valerie

thank you! this helped me!

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IsaacAbodunrin

Thanks so much for this--I';; try it out with my class this Monday.

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zzahrasomji

thankyou i will use this with my class for a day

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laaaaalaaaaaaaaaaa

thank you, it helped my children understand decimals

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kwabena

That is a nice way of introducing the subject

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Anand Turkey

lovely explanation Mark this will help to introduce the concept of decimal to my kids.Thank you very much.

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Gina

Good advice! Thanks

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5

mabel heinzle

thank you ..simple and clear

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Maureen

This is a nice visual way to compare fractions to decimals.

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Sharon

Thank you so much for sharing "Introducing Decimals". I plan to use it with a Year 4 class tomorrow.

Rating: 
5

V

Thank you. This helped introducing the concept to my son.

Rating: 
5

Crinalyn

I hope this will help during my first time of teaching .I'm a student teacher by the way.

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5

Sherry

Great first day, introduction lesson!

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Beverly Bramwell

This was very helpful. Thank you

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0